Film Shoot at 105th

Observed this morning at 105th Street was this film shoot for television’s Gotham:


The scene was set with a vintage Dodge Diplomat (complete with custom GOTHAM license plate), and authentic television smoke for just the right ambiance.  We can only speculate which stars of the small screen may have been in this shot.  Perhaps Adam West himself?

A Friendly Game…

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On any given evening you may observe this gathering of New York’s elite livery cab drivers at an undisclosed location for a friendly game of dominoes. In Spring and Summer they often play en plein air, but as Winter’s winds blow they retreat to the comfort of this specially equipped van. It is a scene virtually invisible to the frazzled motorist, but easily spied by the passing cyclist.

Kossuth Revealed!

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The famed statue of Mr. Lajos Kossuth at 113th and Riverside has for several months been blocked by tall construction fences, leading the public to wonder just what was going on.  All was revealed last week as the barricades were removed to reveal Mr. Kossuth’s much improved surroundings:

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For reference, here is a picture of Mr. Kossuth, “before”:

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And here, the “after”:

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As can be seen, the project included quite a bit of landscaping and stone work, transforming the area surrounding Mr. Kossuth into a more visitor-friendly environment.  To the South, a new bench has been introduced on which one may feed the pigeons and reflect on one’s own Liberty:

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As well as an interesting stone feature:

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The inscription of which reads:

CONSTELLATION OF STARS AS SYMBOLS OF HOPE, VISIBLE IN THE

NIGHT SKY OVER BUDAPEST ON OCTOBER 23 1956, WHEN THE

FIRST SHOTS OF THE REVOLUTION WERE FIRED

Overall, a fitting tribute to Mr. Kossuth, and his contribution to Hungarian Independence.  More may be read about his life at Wikipedia.

Another excellent resource, Daytonian in Manhattan, has a detailed account of the monument’s history, including background on Mr. Kossuth’s connections to New York City, the statue’s original dedication in 1928, its reconstruction in 1930 due to shoddy workmanship, and the fate of three bronze plaques that were never reinstalled.